Tag Archives: sukkah

Occupy Chag: A sukkah pops up in Zuccotti Park

Occupy Judaism pushes forward. After Kol Nidrei services in New York, Philly, DC, Chicago and Boston, Sukkot has come to the Wall Street protests of those cities as well as the protests of Atlanta and LA. Or so I hear. I can only report firsthand on the sukkah that went up at 5pm yesterday at Occupy Wall Street’s downtown Manhattan home base of Zuccotti Park.

A quick summary: There was a lot of press (probably more press than actual Jews celebrating Sukkot), the sukkah was a Pop-Up Sukkah (which you can see in the middle of popping up in the picture above) and music was provided by a klezmer band that just happened to be at the park. And the wind was blowing on a biblical scale.

I’ve got some thoughts about the alliance of Occupy Wall Street and DIY Judaism at New Voices.

I’ve also got a boatload of photos. I wanted to embed a Picasa slideshow of them like I did for Occupy Kol Nidrei, but Picasa isn’t playing nice with me right now. So instead, for my play-by-play of the whole, go check out my Facebook album, which is totally accessible to the public.

I didn’t really like Sukkah City

As far as I can tell, the only relatively negative coverage so far of Sukkah City has been at New Voices. Our slideshow, embedded below, has a few comments from me thrown in. Overall, I disliked Sukkah City because it made Judaism a conceptual abstraction. No one can enter or try to use the sukkot on display, which shows a basic failure to grasp the concept of the sukkah on the part of the exhibition itself.

How is a portable sukah an innovation?

Crossposted to Jewschool.

So the sukah is a remembrance of wandering in the desert and living in portable structures, right?

Tablet suggested on Tuesday a remarkable invention–a portable sukah. Either this is the biggest “no duh” invention in Jewish history, or it’s truly innovative. Think about it. We build these structures to commemorate a nomadic existence, but then leave them in one place for the duration of sukot.

Tablet has this to say about their dubiously-innovative innovation:

In advance of Sukkot, we reached out to architects and designers and asked for contemporary reimaginings of the sukkah. Charles and Julian Boxenbaum, the father-and-son duo behind BUZstudios … [have] delighted us yet again—this time with their portable SukkahSeat.

I’ll admit. It’s pretty cool. I kind of want one. Full story here.